Dave Randle gives the ‘Emissionary Position’ on the VW Gate scandal

Share Our News
A Volkswagen Golf TDI diesel car undergoes an emissions inspection at a garage in Frankfurt am Main, eastern Germany, on September 21, 2015. Shares in German auto giant Volkswagen plummeted more than 20 percent after it emerged that nearly half a million of its diesel cars in the United States had been fitted with software that falsified emissions data. AFP PHOTO / DPA / PATRICK PLEUL   +++   GERMANY OUT

A Volkswagen Golf TDI diesel car undergoes an emissions inspection at a garage in Frankfurt am Main, eastern Germany, on September 21, 2015. Shares in German auto giant Volkswagen plummeted more than 20 percent after it emerged that nearly half a million of its diesel cars in the United States had been fitted with software that falsified emissions data. AFP PHOTO / DPA / PATRICK PLEUL +++ GERMANY OUT

For more than a quarter of a century, the world’s carmakers have been pursuing unrealistic targets, set for them by regulatory authorities with political origins and an eye on winning brownie points from increasingly vocal ecologists.

With its demand-driven rapid turnover of products, the auto-industry was the obvious subject of these targets. Power stations, whether coal, oil or gas-fired, don’t do rapid response and would take lifetimes to clean up their act in any meaningful way, and the so-called zero pollution of nuclear power, in a ironic parallel, gains the appellation by hiding the pollution away for future generations to solve.

An industry whose vital spark is innovation was inspired by the challenges and, in a few short years, enabled the century-old internal combustion engine to multiply its power output and reduce its unpleasant side-effects so dramatically – even miraculously – that it put the then game-changing new developments with hydrogen fuel cells and electric propulsion into a shade from which it is still trying to emerge.

Click here to read the full story on Counterpunch